Chapter 16

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Please keep these annotations SPOILER-FREE by not revealing information from later pages in the novel.

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Page 172

'85 Sassicaia
Tenuta San Guido is an Italian wine producer in the DOC Bolgheri in Toscana, known as a producer of "Super Tuscan" wine. Its wine Sassicaia is considered one of Italy's leading Bordeaux-style red wines (ie comparable to the Tignanello appearing on pg 66). Tenuta San Guido is member of the Primum Familiae Vini. From WIKI.

Page 173

riyals
The name of the currencies of Saudi Arabia and Qatar. There's a slight disconnect here, however, as if hashslingrz's account is "in the Emirates," as mentioned above, the currency should really be Emirati dirhams.

Page 174

Eternal September
A foreboding name. The Eternal September started September 1993, the month that internet service provider America Online (AOL) began offering Usenet access to its (very many) members . Before then, every year in September, a large number of new university freshmen acquired access to Usenet for the first time, and thongs took some time to calm down as they become accustomed to Usenet's standards of conduct. After Eternal September the calm never came as more and more people came on line.

Page 177

"Up to whom they must never miss a chance to suck"
Perhaps Pynchon is riffing on Winston Churchill's alleged marginal note of 27 February 1944, to a priggish civil servant's memo objecting to the ending of a sentences with prepositions: "This is the kind of tedious nonsense up with which I will not put!"

Motor City psychobilly Elvis Hitler
Yes. There really is a band called Elvis Hitler. And they're from Detroit (a.k.a., the "Motor City").

singing the Green Acres theme to the tune of "Purple Haze"
And yes, Elvis Hitler really did a version of the Green Acres theme to the tune of Jimi Hendrix's "Purple Haze." You can hear it here.

The bizarro song in question is called "Green Haze, Parts 1 and 2," from their 1988 album "Disgraceland." Is Maxine feeling nostalgia from this particular song, or for "Green Acres" and/or "Purple Haze"? Maxine doesn't strike me as a psychobilly person, but maybe. Also, "Green Haze" is the name of an early Miles Davis tune, YouTube, found on "The Musings of Miles." Who knew?

zaftig body
Slightly fat in an attractive way.

Page 178

Jules and Jim
a 1962 French film by François Truffaut, a classic film about a love triangle. Wikipedia.

hours on the LIE
Long Island Expressway

money shot
In film-making usage the shot that cannot be repeated (or only at great costs); in porn movies naturally the "cum shot"

"sub-vaudeville routine"
So bad, it's not even up to vaudeville's corny standards

Page 179

Tanger Outlets
An outlet mall with locations throughout the US.

"Where could this tape have come from?"
Recalls the mysterious film reels in Gravity's Rainbow that are used to convey hidden messages to certain characters.

Mrs. Grundy
A figurative name for a holier-than-thou, self-righteous person, a goody-two-shoes. Named after a minor character in Thomas Morton's play Speed the Plough (1798).

According to Wiki, she (Pynchonesquely?) never makes an appearance in the play, and is merely talked about.

Page 180

begins idly to channel-surf. A form of meditating.
Interesting to note the shift from Vinelands 80's Tube addicts to Bleeding Edges 00's new form of meditating. Could it have to do with the availability of channels?

Page 181

Homer strangling Bart . . .
Refers to characters from the animated TV show The Simpsons, in which the father (Homer) often gets angry and strangles his son Bart. Pynchon himself (well, his voice, at least) has appeared a couple of times on this television program.

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Buddhist Parable of the Burning Coal
Some musings on this Buddhist story and similar ones on a "Fake Buddha Quotes" site. Follow the link to see how coal relates to sensuality and excrement. Where have you gone, Brigadier Pudding?


Chapter 1
pp. 1-7
Chapter 2
pp. 8-19
Chapter 3
pp. 20-29
Chapter 4
pp. 30-40
Chapter 5
pp. 41-52
Chapter 6
pp. 53-67
Chapter 7
pp. 68-79
Chapter 8
pp. 80-86
Chapter 9
pp. 87-95
Chapter 10
pp. 96-111
Chapter 11
pp. 112-120
Chapter 12
pp. 121-133
Chapter 13
pp. 134-144
Chapter 14
pp. 145-159
Chapter 15
pp. 160-171
Chapter 16
pp. 172-184
Chapter 17
pp. 185-197
Chapter 18
pp. 198-210
Chapter 19
pp. 211-218
Chapter 20
pp. 219-229
Chapter 21
pp. 230-238
Chapter 22
pp. 239-246
Chapter 23
pp. 247-255
Chapter 24
pp. 256-264
Chapter 25
pp. 265-273
Chapter 26
pp. 274-287
Chapter 27
pp. 288-300
Chapter 28
pp. 301-313
Chapter 29
pp. 314-326
Chapter 30
pp. 327-337
Chapter 31
pp. 338-346
Chapter 32
pp. 347-353
Chapter 33
pp. 354-364
Chapter 34
pp. 365-382
Chapter 35
pp. 383-394
Chapter 36
pp. 395-407
Chapter 37
pp. 408-422
Chapter 38
pp. 423-438
Chapter 39
pp. 439-447
Chapter 40
pp. 448-462
Chapter 41
pp. 463-477
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