PE Check123 Chapter 7 - Thomas Pynchon Wiki | Bleeding Edge

Chapter 7

Revision as of 09:39, 23 September 2013 by Greenlantern (Talk | contribs) (Page 73)

Please keep these annotations SPOILER-FREE by not revealing information from later pages in the novel.

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Page 68

Melanie's Mall
This was--God help us--a real toy. You can see Melanie, her mall, her friends, and even her escalator here, which even includes the tag line, "It's cool at the mall."

Also, here's a guide to all the Melanie's Mall products.

Dragonball Z
Pynchon commands at least the very basics of Dragonball Z's plot, as evidence by the grouping of Goku with his son Gohan within a comma, plus the title of "Prince" Vegeta. Someone who knew absolutely jack about the show would have written, "including Vegeta, Goku, Gohan, Zarbon, and others."

Page 69

MUD clones
"Multi-User Dungeon" games, an old-school, text-based video game. Wikipedia

VRML
Virtual Reality Modeling Language, pronounced vermal or by its initials, originally—before 1995—known as the Virtual Reality Markup Language.

Page 70

Jolt
Jolt Cola is a carbonated soft drink produced by Wet Planet Beverages. It was created in 1985 by C. J. Rapp as a highly caffeinated cola and was targeted towards students and young professionals, stressing its use as a stimulant in a similar manner as energy drinks. From WIKI.

Fernet-Brancas with ginger-ale chasers
Fernet-Branca is a spirit from Italy that's extremely popular in the San Francisco Bay Area, in fact, the area accounts for 25% of its consumption. Likewise, it's most commonly served in the area with a "ginger back."

Page 71

celestial pastry exercise
pie in the sky.

Page 72

Ponzi scheme
A Ponzi scheme is a fraudulent investment operation that pays returns to its investors from their own money or the money paid by subsequent investors, rather than from profit earned by the individual or organization running the operation. The Ponzi scheme usually entices new investors by offering higher returns than other investments, in the form of short-term returns that are either abnormally high or unusually consistent. Perpetuation of the high returns requires an ever-increasing flow of money from new investors to keep the scheme going. The scheme is named after Charles Ponzi, who became notorious for using the technique in 1920. While Ponzi didn't invent the scheme (for example, Charles Dickens' 1844 novel Martin Chuzzlewit and 1857 novel Little Dorrit each described such a scheme), his operation took in so much money that it was the first to become known throughout the United States. Ponzi's original scheme was based on the arbitrage of international reply coupons for postage stamps; however, he soon diverted investors' money to make payments to earlier investors and himself. From WIKI.

Page 73

Voorhees, Krueger
names of horror film villains: Jason Voorhees of Friday the 13th and Freddy Krueger of Nightmare on Elm Street.

Courtney Pulitzer's downtown soirees
Courtney Pulitzer branched off from her @The Scene column with @NY and created Courtney Pulitzer's Cyber Scene and her popular networking events Cocktails with Courtney. From WIKI.

kalimotxos
Kalimotxo, also known as cocavino, is a drink consisting of equal parts red wine and cola-based soft drink.

Page 77

I BELIEVE YOU HAVE MY STAPLER
"I Believe You Have My Stapler" is a catchphrase originally uttered by the character Milton in the 1999 movie Office Space. The movie is about a group of employees who hate their jobs and decide to rebel against their greedy boss.




Chapter 1
pp. 1-7
Chapter 2
pp. 8-19
Chapter 3
pp. 20-29
Chapter 4
pp. 30-40
Chapter 5
pp. 41-52
Chapter 6
pp. 53-67
Chapter 7
pp. 68-79
Chapter 8
pp. 80-86
Chapter 9
pp. 87-95
Chapter 10
pp. 96-111
Chapter 11
pp. 112-120
Chapter 12
pp. 121-133
Chapter 13
pp. 134-144
Chapter 14
pp. 145-159
Chapter 15
pp. 160-171
Chapter 16
pp. 172-184
Chapter 17
pp. 185-197
Chapter 18
pp. 198-210
Chapter 19
pp. 211-218
Chapter 20
pp. 219-229
Chapter 21
pp. 230-238
Chapter 22
pp. 239-246
Chapter 23
pp. 247-255
Chapter 24
pp. 256-264
Chapter 25
pp. 265-273
Chapter 26
pp. 274-287
Chapter 27
pp. 288-300
Chapter 28
pp. 301-313
Chapter 29
pp. 314-326
Chapter 30
pp. 327-337
Chapter 31
pp. 338-346
Chapter 32
pp. 347-353
Chapter 33
pp. 354-364
Chapter 34
pp. 365-382
Chapter 35
pp. 383-394
Chapter 36
pp. 395-407
Chapter 37
pp. 408-422
Chapter 38
pp. 423-438
Chapter 39
pp. 439-447
Chapter 40
pp. 448-462
Chapter 41
pp. 463-477
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